Data and Statistics

UNICEF COVID-19 and children

Author:
UNICEF Data, Analytics, Planning and Monitoring
Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Contributor:
Publication Year:
2020
November 17, 2020
  • SDG 3 - Good Health and Well-Being

UNICEF data hub

We're leveraging our strongest resource – the data, and what they tell us about the lives of children around the world – to inform the world’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and ensure children’s needs are front and center. While no one can predict exactly how COVID-19 will shape our lives, we do know that children are being impacted in profound ways and those who are most vulnerable will encounter hardships that will endure long after the virus subsides. Our COVID-19 hub links to pertinent information on the situation of children during the pandemic.

In this new data and analytical digest, we’ll be providing periodic updates on our findings to keep you abreast of what we’ve learned and how we’re working to better protect children. Highlighting a variety of knowledge products collected from the wider UNICEF community and beyond, this digest is a collaborative effort to disseminate the most essential knowledge available right now, produced by the Data and Analytical Cell of the COVID-19 Secretariat. 

Just as our new COVID-19 reality continues to evolve, so too will our questions and analyses to anticipate children’s deprivations and ensure their rights are upheld. 

Children are not the face of this pandemic. But they risk being among its biggest victims, as children’s lives are nonetheless being changed in profound ways. All children, of all ages, and in all countries, are being affected, in particular by the socio-economic impacts and, in some cases, by mitigation measures that may inadvertently do more harm than good.

This is a universal crisis and, for some children, the impact will be lifelong.

 

Moreover, the harmful effects of this pandemic will not be distributed equally. They are expected to be most damaging for children in the poorest countries, and in the poorest neighbourhoods, and for those in already disadvantaged or vulnerable situations.

 

Explore this resource.

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